“POP” psychology

That'll be 5 cents please!

That’ll be 5 cents please!

“Why don’t you shut up with your pop psychology!”

Those of us that like to write about certain behavioral disorders tend to get the alleged insult thrown our way on occasion. I have even had a couple of people make this same comment on some of my posts. They think calling me a “pop” psychologist is an insult of the highest degree. Well, I have news for them. The term isn’t insulting at all. In fact, it’s quite accurate, even though the name-caller doesn’t mean it to be when they toss it out there.  

My response to their attempt to be insulting is that they should spend as much time researching their etymology as I spend researching the topics I write about. Their attempt to shame me into silence has absolutely no affect on me at all, except to cause me to shake my head at their ignorance and laziness.

Pop Psychology as defined by the online version of the Cambridge Dictionary is:

“Theories and advice about human behavior that are easily understood and intended to help people improve their lives.”

So, thank you, because this is exactly what I am trying to accomplish with my writing and observations.

Like many of my colleagues that write about our experiences and recovery after being subjected to personality disordered individuals, the amount of reading, researching and speaking with other victims that is behind every single word that we write, is astounding. Not to mention, our own personal pain and suffering.

I am grateful to the many Pop Psychologists that I have the pleasure of knowing and associating with. Without them, I have no idea what condition my mental state would be in. With their help and assistance I have been able to understand exactly what was happening to me and I was given tools to guide me through every step of my own recovery.

So, you want to call me a Pop Psychologist?

I’ll take it as a compliment.

Next!! 🙂

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About Madeline Scribes

A writer with a sense of humor. If anyone can laugh at life, it's me.
This entry was posted in All kinds of Advice and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to “POP” psychology

  1. Paula says:

    And those who criticize rarely have alternative solutions. The amazing reality is that I have actually been approached for support from survivors who have degrees and certifications in psychology! They admit that personality disorders are not accurately taught or reviewed in psychology programs. Why? Because they are disorders without a cure. However, because victims/survivors are speaking out and explaining what is happening to them, psychiatrists and counselors are realizing they CAN help us in better ways. They can help us define our confusion and work through the trauma. We are the evidence-based research so many psychology majors and practitioners have needed for a very long time. No more being fascinated by the disordered. It’s time to be fascinated with the victims/survivors who turn their lives around thanks to each other and the small number of psychiatrists and counselors listening and paying attention to us rather than relying solely on textbooks and theories. 🙂

    Like

    • I suffered from dealing with people with personality disorders and I was lucky enough, after 4 years, to find a friend who could tell me what the hell happened. She had studied psychology in college. I was so grateful.

      Like

  2. Paula says:

    Typos galore! Sorry. 😦

    Like

  3. Girl, I will lie on your couch anytime!!!! Pop-psychologist indeed! Xo

    Like

  4. whine-wine-whatever says:

    Experience is a far better teacher than a textbook.

    Like

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