reading the Blurb, but not the entire post

Business agreement deal at coffee shop

When you only read the blurb, the lead-in that describes a written article, but you fail to click the link and read the entire post, are you getting the Big Picture, or just the teaser that has nothing to do with the final words?

Some folks read the blurb and they think they know what the gist of the entire post is and they respond, but only to the blurb. This is a bit frustrating to those of us that spend hours composing a thoughtful article that the blurb barely scratches the surface of.

Why bother writing beyond the blurb if that’s all folks are reading?

“I was told I have an inoperable tumor and only have one week left to live. I was going to another doctor to get a second opinion.” [ 684 more words ]  

There scattered throughout the comments are folks suggesting alternative treatments and saying how sorry they were and could they help at all, etc. Don’t misunderstand because an outpouring of love like that feels awesome! Except the other 684 words were all about the diagnosis being part of a bad dream and never even happened in real life.

The writer feels like a turd and the people commenting feel duped and a little embarrassed. None of it needed to happen if they had just clicked the link to read the article, instead of rushing to be heard. You see, that’s all a writer is asking; to be heard/read, but they tend to take their time getting to the point…I guess. .

It reminds me of the saying that people never listen with the intent of understanding, they listen with the intent of responding. Most of the time we are so busy composing our response in our heads that we never thoroughly understand what is being said to us.

On social media this happens to me frequently. I used to ask the person that commented if they read the entire post, or if they were just responding to the blurb when it was noticeable they definitely had not read the entire article at all. I don’t do that anymore. Now I just thank them for their engagement and move on. If they’re interested maybe they will come back later and read it, but more often than not, the only thing they were interested in was making a comment and being heard/read.

I click the link and read the post if it’s something I feel compelled to respond to. You can always count on me giving a thoughtful and encouraging comment, not because I just want to be heard/read/seen, but because I respect the whole dish of what other people have to contribute to a society that social media has given so many unfulfilling shortcuts to digest.

Period.

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About Madeline Scribes

A writer with a sense of humor. If anyone can laugh at life, it's me.
This entry was posted in All kinds of Advice and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

15 Responses to reading the Blurb, but not the entire post

  1. Yes!

    And this: “It reminds me of the saying that people never listen with the intent of understanding, they listen with the intent of responding.”

    But maybe there are some people who need a blatant prompt from the blurb…direct, precise instructions that one should click on the link after skimming the blurb. Having the additional word count at the end of the blurb may not be enough to inspire them to click through?

    It could go like this: “blurbblurbblurb text…and this idea is expanded upon in the blog entry below — just click on the link for the rest of the details!”

    On the other hand, you can lead a horse to water…you know the rest. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I agree totally, your blurbs are so well written and the big picture was amazing, I saw a hippopotamus in it! Well done on a great post!!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Actually I do agree with what you are saying. I used to have one reader who claimed to read all my crap and they’d tell me how great it was. But I’m a needy person I like people to tell me why a post is good (or bad) so I started randomly questioning them about certain aspects and leaving little bits in the story out to see how much this person was reading and sure enough I was able to prove pretty quickly how much they were actually reading. Like you I stopped worrying about it.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. I rarely think about my first sentence. Perhaps I should.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m wondering now if it even matters. I think if someone comes to my blog with the intention of reading it, the first sentence probably doesn’t matter to them. Those are the readers I wish for all of us bloggers to have. I’m going to go and check out some of your first sentences today, Dave. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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